• PROJECT 1

    Prenatal Exposure to Tetrachloroethylene-Contaminated Drinking Water and the Risk of Birth Defects
    Project Leader, Ann Aschengrau (Boston University School of Public Health)

    Studying risk of birth defects in a population exposed to perchloroethylene (PCE, a peroxisome proliferator) in drinking water.

  • PROJECT 2

    Analyzing Patterns in Epidemiologic and Toxicologic Data
    Project Leader, Veronica Vieira (University of California, Irvine; Adjunct, Boston University School of Public Health), Co-investigator, Tom Webster (Boston University School of Public Health)
    Developing improved methods for mapping epidemiologic and chemical mixture data on reproductive and developmental outcomes while adjusting for known risk factors.

  • PROJECT 3

      Environmental PPARγ agonist-mediated toxicity in the developing immune system
    Project Leader, Jennifer Schlezinger (Boston University School of Public Health)

    Determining the molecular mechanism by which individual and complex mixtures of environmental chemicals impair the development of the mammalian immune system and accelerate bone aging


                                                                                                                              

  • PROJECT 4

    Mechanism and Impacts of Dioxin Resistance in Fish
    Project Leader, Mark E. Hahn (Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution,
    Co-investigator, Sibel I. Karchner (Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution)

    Understanding mechanisms underlying differential sensitivity to the developmental toxicity of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) that act through the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR).

  • PROJECT 5

    Developmental Toxicity of non-Dioxin-like PCBs and Chemical Mixtures
    Project Leader, John J. Stegeman (Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution),
    Co-Investigator, Jared V. Goldstone (Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution)

    A comprehensive study of ortho-PCB effects on development, and possible mechanisms using fish models.

Welcome to the BU SRP Website!

The Boston University Superfund Research Program is an interdisciplinary program that conducts and communicates research on the impacts of improperly managed hazardous wastes. Specifically, we study the effects of exposures to substances commonly encountered in hazardous waste disposal on reproduction and development in humans and wildlife.

The program is divided into five projects within two main areas: 1) Epidemiological Studies and 2) Methods and Mechanisms. The program also includes five cores, which provide support both to the program itself as well as to communities and other researchers.

We hope this web site will be useful to you in learning about this research and using the tools and information we have developed. If you are visiting the site looking specifically for resources available to communities faced with hazardous waste disposal issues, please see the Community Resources section. If you are in government, research, or industry and would like to see the research tools and methods we have made publicly available, please see the Research Resources section.

Supported with funding from the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences' Superfund Research Program.
 

Affiliated Institutions

The Superfund Research Program at Boston University

Supported with funding from the
National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences' Superfund Research Program

This page is licensed under a Creative Commons attribution/share-alike license.

Contact us

Boston University School of Public Health
Department of Environmental Health
715 Albany Street, T4W
Boston, MA 02118
Telephone: 617-638-4620
Fax: 617-638-4857

Community Engagement and Research Translation Leader
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Community Engagement and Research Translation Staff
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Program Director
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